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Last week, I travelled with my daughter and 16 others to serve some of the poorest school children in Honduras through a Cleveland, Ohio based organization called Hope for Honduran Children. Lovingly run by Karen and John Godt, Hope for Honduran Children sponsors more than a half dozen service trips throughout the year. Since my daughter had gone on one of these trips as a high school senior, she convinced me my teaching life would be changed forever if I came along on a trip with her this spring. And she was very, very right! An average day of the eight day trip was spent visiting a remote mountain school in the morning and spending time with the boys who live at Flor Azul in Neuvo Paraiso In the afternoons.  Each person in our group came to Honduras prepared to teach a lesson or share a craft. Of course, I wanted to combine literature with a craft that the children would enjoy.  Before we left, I zeroed in on Dr. Seuss, and after scouring Amazon for options, I found an a English/Spanish version of The Cat in the Hat to take along. A little bit of time spent on Pinterest and I located a template for making large red and white striped hats.  Card stock was printed, red stripes were traced, blue head bands were precut and red duct tape was packed in my carry on!

Karen suggested I save my activity for the day we were to visit Neguara, a remote mountain  village several hours east of Tegucigalpa.  Hope for Honduran Children takes every one of its service groups to visit this school, unless there has been recent rain, which makes the steep, rocky road to the school impassible.  We had a very long, bumpy bus ride and in addition to bringing lessons for the children, we had suitcases full of donated clothing, oatmeal, pasta, children’s vitamins and CANDY!

We were told the teacher at this school walks more than an hour each way from his home to the school.  Although he was offered a teaching job nearer to his home, he continues the daily walk to Neguara because if he didn’t teach there, he says no one else would.  And what a fine teacher!  He had the children lined up and ready to greet us as we got off the bus – smallest to tallest with boys on one side and girls on the other.  It brought tears to my eyes.

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The children hugged each of us and then hurried into their school, taking their seats to wait for the lessons to start. I paired up with my daughter’s friend Sammie, who is minoring in Spanish in college, to read the book first in Spanish and then in English.

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They listened with intent, and enjoyed when I passed the pictures around and acted it out a bit for them.

Reading Cat in the Hat – Neguara video

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The book is really quite long for the attention span of a small child, especially when it is being read twice. We decided to cut it short and move quickly on to the craft.

They loved making the hats, and with some assistance, we soon had a room full of Cats in Hats!
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Video – Showing off Hatsimage
It was a moving sight to see the whole school posing for a picture in their hats, and I was so tempted to leave the book behind as a donation, but my daughter had promised we had more kids to share Dr. Seuss with at Neuvo Paraiso. These boys go to school each morning and the return to the complex of buildings where they live, sleep and eat their meals. We had several afternoons to spend with them, playing games, making beautiful silk screened logo shirt thanks to the donations of an artist on our trip, and reading The Cat in the Hat. I was tickled to see 14, 15 and 16 year old boys working through the English text – sometimes laughing at the story and practicing their pronunciation in rhyme!

Video – Group Reading

Video of Christopher

Our very last day was spent with boys who live together at Casa Noble in Santa  Lucia.  They are mostly older boys – some attend classes at the university.  Their English is pretty good but The Cat in the Hat still presented a challenge.

Video – Alex Reading

One of my lasting memories of the week will always be of the group of us – moms, kids, new Honduran family members – huddled on the couch taking turns reading together with the a English speakers reading Spanish and vice versa. image
Video – Group Read featuring Jimmy

I ended up leaving the book at Casa Noble. I explained to them that the Dr. Seuss was commissioned by his publisher to write a primer using 225 “new reader” sight words. Ironically, I had come to Honduras with almost no words in my word bank. My teaching life was enriched forever by watching the story magically draw its own audience. That Cat in the Hat brings “Good fun that is funny” even when his name is El Gato Ensombrerato.

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WVIZ Ideastream Workshop

Teaching Primary Sources and NonFiction in the Blended Learning Classroom
This session will focus on learning to access, select, interpret, and manipulate digital media from the U.S. Library of Congress American Memory Collection to teach 21st century digital research and information literacy. You and your students can merge archived text, photography, and printed ephemera to create ditigal scrapbooks and exhibits for presentations and projects. Time will be provided for collaboration and lesson planning. (Grades 6-12)

Link to today’s Library of Congress slides.

This is my first Christmas of retirement and I still find myself calling the week between the holidays “break”. Although I have enjoyed being able to bake a few more Christmas cookies and spend more guilt-free time enjoying family, I will miss returning to the classroom the day after Christmas break because it was one of my favorite days of the year. Instead of smacking students with a lesson, I preferred giving them a chance to talk – and listen to one another. I would put categories on the board –

  • Something I Gave
  • Something I Got
  • Something I Saw
  • Something I Read

We wold go around the room sharing the highlights of our breaks. In my senior classes, students were encouraged to change I Got to I Got Into if they had college acceptance news. We talked about movies, travels, annoying family members, and always – books. It gave me an opportunity to bring in the books I had been reading over break and share my family stories too. It was always one day of the year that students listened.

I just realized this Christmas, we sort of recreated this with our gift giving for our, now adult, children. This year, we postponed Christmas and didn’t open a single gift until December 26th, the day my son, who works in another state as a paramedic, was able to get home. Santa brought brown paper wrapped gifts labeled with red tags tied with baker’s twine.

  • Something I Want
  • Something I Need
  • Something to Wear
  • Something to Read

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I had read about this idea and decided we needed a new tradition. We also drew names at Thanksgiving and had to make something for the person whose name we drew. My gift was a lovely rosemary butter sculpture.

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Oberlin High School Workshop

January 5th, 2013 | Posted by Lackey in My Teaching Life - (0 Comments)

 

 

  Flipped Out Socrates – Resources and Links

 

Susan Cain Resources

Take the Quiet Quiz

Susan Cain at Ted-Ed

Susan Cain on TED with Transcript

Quiet by Susan Cain – Bonus Content including RSA Animation

Susan Cain’s Website

Today’s Handouts –

Pre-Socratic Seminar Question Writing

Socratic Instructions

Socratic_Rubric

Closing Video

Somebody That I Used to Know Parody – Ted-Ed

Additional Links, Handout and Web Resources

TED-ED Lessons Worth Sharing

TED Blog – Flip this Lesson

National Paideia Center  – Excellent resources for teachers and principals

Introduction to Socratic Seminars

Socratic Seminars

Socratic Seminar Evaluation Tally 20 points

Using Blooms to Promote your Understanding of Text

Simplified Blooms for Students

Blended Learning Professional Development Courses by David and Linda Lackey

WVIZ Idea Stream Brochure PDF

 Today’s Workshop Powerpoint

Flipped Out Socrates

 

 

 

We Retired

July 29th, 2012 | Posted by Lackey in My Teaching Life - (0 Comments)

Now that we are retired, we can smile First Day of School 2011-2012

Read all about it in our local paper – http://www.cleveland.com/strongsville/index.ssf/2012/06/retiring_teachers_reflect_on_t.html